Famous Syrians You May Know

My original relatives came from Mesopotania and then went to Canaan if you go all the way back. America is a place where people have come from all over. Until now.

Our US media seems perfectly happy to spread the hate. But they don’t speak for us.

Here is a good article from the Washington Post.

“All of the other suspects in the Paris attacks appear to have been European citizens. In fact, large numbers of citizens from France, Britain and other Western nations have traveled to Syria and Iraq to fight, suggesting that the problem is not so much those coming from over there but those who are already here”

Here is a list of a few  famous Syrian people or of Syrian decent  that you might know.

Paul Anka

Anka was born in Ottawa, Ontario to Camelia (née Tannis) and Andrew Emile “Andy” Anka, Sr., who owned a restaurant called the Locanda.[2] His parents were both Antiochian Orthodox Christians. Anka’s father was Syrian, his mother was Lebanese “from the town of Kfarmishki, in Lebanon.

Shannon Elizabeth

Shannon Elizabeth Fadal (born September 7, 1973),[1] known professionally as Shannon Elizabeth, is an American actress and former fashion model. Elizabeth is well known for her roles in comedy films such as American Pie, Scary Movie and Jay And Silent Bob Strike Back. She is also known for her work in horror films such as Thirteen Ghosts, Cursed, and Night of the Demons. She became widely known as a sex symbol for her role in the 1999 comedy film American Pie.

Jerry Seinfeld

Seinfeld was born in Brooklyn, New York. His father, Kalmen Seinfeld (1918–1985), was born to a Jewish immigrant from Kherson Oblast in southern Ukraine. His mother, Betty (née Hosni; born 1914) is of Syrian Jewish descent; her parents Selim and Salha Hosn were from Aleppo

 

Paula Abdul

Abdul was born in San Fernando, California, to Jewish parents. Abdul’s father, Harry Abdul, was born into the Syrian Jewish community in Aleppo, Syria, was raised in Brazil, and subsequently immigrated to the United States.[6] Her mother, the concert pianist Lorraine M. (née Rykiss), grew up in one of the two Jewish families in Minnedosa, Manitoba in Canada, and has Ashkenazi Jewish ancestors from Ukraine.

Syrian Americans

Syrian Americans are Americans of Syrian descent or background. Syrian Americans may be members of a number of differing ethnicities, including Arabs, Armenians, Arameans, Assyrians, Syrian Jews, Kurds, Syrian Turkmens and Circassians. It is believed that the first significant wave of Syrian immigrants to arrive in the United States was in 1880.[3] Many of the earliest Syrian Americans settled in New York City, Boston, and Detroit. Immigration from Syria to the United States suffered a long hiatus after the United States Congress passed the Immigration Act of 1924, which restricted immigration. More than 40 years later, the Immigration Act of 1965, abolished the quotas and immigration from Syria to the United States saw a surge. An estimated 64,600 Syrians emigrated to the United States between 1961 and 2000

F.Murry Abraham

Abraham was born as Murray Abraham on October 24, 1939 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the son of Frederick Abraham, an auto mechanic, and his wife Josephine (née Stello), a housewife.[3][4] His father was Assyrian[5] and emigrated from Syria during the 1920s famine; his paternal grandfather was a chanter in the Syriac Orthodox Church.[3] His mother, one of 14 children, was Italian American, and the daughter of an immigrant who worked in the coal mines of Western Pennsylvania

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs’s biological father, Abdulfattah “John” Jandali (b. 1931), was born into a Muslim household and grew up in Homs, Syria.[9] Jandali is the son of a self-made millionaire who did not go to college and a mother who was a traditional housewife.[9] While an undergraduate at the American University of Beirut, he was a student activist and spent time in jail for his political activities.[9] Although Jandali initially wanted to study law, he eventually decided to study economics and political science.[9] He pursued a PhD in the latter subject at the University of Wisconsin, where he met Joanne Carole Schieble, a Catholic of Swiss and German descent, who grew up on a farm in Wisconsin.

 

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary. ” Steve Jobs

Please feel free to add anyone I forgot.

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My Martin County: Ground Floor Farm

My Martin County: Ground Floor Farm

This is where I went on my Black Friday.

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Ground Floor Farm is our local urban farm. In 2014 they raised over 20,000 with a kick starter campaign with 144 backers.

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Share a hug!

This is the Martin County I love. People with wonderful ideas interact with the community. Together the community is nurtured. We become a better place. Together.

From

“Co-founders Micah Hartman, Michael Meier, and Jackie Vitale together conceived Ground Floor Farm as a space that combines food, art, and civic engagement in ways that benefit and help strengthen our community. Ground Floor Farm is part of a hometown renaissance, in which individuals focus their energy and creativity on the places they come from and through which the importance of a vibrant community center is reclaimed and revitalized.

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We accomplish this by growing and producing delicious food on a small urban farm and giving others the tools and resources to do so themselves; by showing that productive agriculture can take place in small spaces in urban centers and that it can be economically sustainable; by providing the space and resources for others to use their talents, skills, and interests to engage their community; and by curating an exciting and diverse program of cultural and social events that engage the hearts and minds of this community.”

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This is the Martin County we want!

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Next week they will have an event called DSC_0002

Make.Share.Do. is a weekend skill-sharing conference exploring homesteading, self-reliance and interdependence.

Highlights

Saturday, December 5th WORKSHOPS

20 one-hour workshops, taught by experts from around the state on topics including:

rain water harvesting, meditation, power tools, sprouts, herbalism, bike maintenance, seed saving, gardening, soap making, and more.

There will be a Seed Swap all day

5-9 Night Market

Dinner from Fruits and Roots, Crust Vegan Pizza Kitchen and other local food producers.

Sunday, Dec 6 all day

Hands on intensives. Explore fermentation, herbalism, vegetable productions, beekeeping and brewing beer.

For more info on the summit, the farm and an upcoming schedule

http://www.groundfloorfarm.com/makesharedo/

to connect on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groundfloorfarm

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Just want to take a moment to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving. If you do not celebrate I just wish you a wonderful day filled with good wishes.

Here is the original Alice’s restaurant which has been part of my Thanksgiving no matter where I’ve been for many years.

The story of Thanksgiving may be a fable but here is story that will stand the test of time sung by one of our favorite and beloved storytellers Arlo Guthrie.

 

The True Story Of Thanksgiving

click on the link above for the whole story written by

“The first Thanksgiving Day did occur in the year 1637, but it was nothing like our Thanksgiving today. On that day the Massachusetts Colony Governor, John Winthrop, proclaimed such a “Thanksgiving” to celebrate the safe return of a band of heavily armed hunters, all colonial volunteers. They had just returned from their journey to what is now Mystic, Connecticut where they massacred 700 Pequot Indians. Seven hundred Indians – men, women and children – all murdered.

The Pilgrims in Plymouth had a hard time for the first couple of years. While nature was no friend, their troubles were mostly their own doing. Poor planning was their downfall. These mostly city dwelling Europeans failed to include among them persons with the skills needed in settling the North American wilderness. Having reached the forests and fields of Massachusetts they turned out to be pathetic hunters and incompetent butchers. With game everywhere, they went hungry. First, they couldn’t catch and kill it. Then they couldn’t cut it up, prepare it, preserve it and create a storehouse for those days when fresh supplies would run low. To compensate for their shortage of essential protein they turned to their European ways and their Christian culture. They instituted a series of religious observances. They could not hunt or farm well, but they seemed skilled at praying.

They developed a taste for something both religious and useful. They called it a Day of Fasting. Without food it seemed like a good idea. From necessity, that single Day became multiple Days. As food supplies dwindled the Days of Fasting came in bunches. Each of these episodes was eventually and thankfully followed by a meal. Appropriately enough, the Puritans credited God for this good fortune. They referred to the fact they were allowed to eat again as a “Thanksgiving.” And they wrote it down. Thus, the first mention of the word – “Thanksgiving.” Let there be no mistake here. On that first Thanksgiving there was no turkey, no corn, no cranberries, no stuffing. And no dessert. Those fortunate Pilgrims were lucky to get a piece of fish and a potato. All things considered, it was a Thanksgiving feast.

Did the Pilgrims share their Thanksgiving meal with the local Indians, the Wampanoag and Pequot? No. That never happened. That is, until its inclusion in the “Thanksgiving Story” in 1890.”

A total bummer.

Which is why my favorite story about Thanksgiving is Alice’s Restaurant.

There is nothing we can do about history but there is everything we can about the moment we are in and the present. So lets make it a good one world wide from this “Thanksgiving Day” on.

Namaste!

Free Treasure Coast Thanksgiving Dinners

Last year I didn’t have the energy to drive to Orlando so I stayed home and spent the day with Pastor Guy at Jensen Beach Christian Church and helped to serve and eat Thanksgiving Dinner.

I did the same thing the first year I lived here serving at another church. It was a great experience.

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Here is a list of wonderful places serving up Thanksgiving on Thanksgiving day. You can go and eat or help or both.

Free or low cost thanksgiving dinners

Jupiter

El Sol Jupiter
106 Military Trail
Jupiter
561-745-9860

Martin County
Jensen Beach Christian Church
1890 NE Church St
Jensen Beach, FL 34957
noon to six

Thanksgiving Feast: 1,000 meals will be handed out on a first-come, first-served basis. Gertrude Walden Child Care Center, 601 SE Lake St., Stuart, 9-11 am, Nov. 24.
Thanksgiving Meal: First United Methodist Church of Stuart, Fellowship Hall, 1500 S Kanner Hwy., 11 am-1 pm, Nov. 24. To volunteer or to donate food: 772-781-0223.
Indian River County
First Church of God, 1105 58th Avenue, is again opening its doors to the community on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 26 for a complimentary dinner served 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. All are welcome to attend.
Thanksgiving Dinner: For homeless & home alone. Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1850 6th Ave., Vero Beach, noon, Nov. 24. RSVP: 772-567-2253.
Thanksgiving meal: For homeless; 1-3 p.m. Nov. 24, Homeless Family Center, 720 4th St., Vero Beach. To donate or volunteer, call 772-567-5537; HomelessFamilyCenter.com.

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Thanksgiving Dinner: IRMC cafeteria, 1000 36th St., Vero Beach, 11 am-2 pm; 4-7 pm, Nov. 24. $7.95. No reservations. 772-567-4311, ext. 1600; irmc.cc.

ST Lucie County
Mustard Seed Ministries Thanksgiving feast: Donate turkeys, money, volunteer, call 772-465-6021. Receive a meal 772-460-5414. Orange Ave., 9th Street, Fort Pierce and Discovery Church, 7650 S. U.S. 1, Port St. Lucie. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 24.

If you hear of anyplace else just let me know. Thanks!

How to dispose of unwanted medications

How to dispose of unwanted medications.

This is a huge issue. It’s HUGE! Not only is it an issue for us, our St Lucie River and Indian River Lagoon but its an issue everywhere people flush their medications down the toilet. This is also true for your pet’s medication. This is true for all medication.

DON’T FLUSH YOU MEDICATIONS DOWN THE TOILET!

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“”While the concentrations of these substances found in our water bodies are hundreds or thousands of times lower than the therapeutic dosages found in the medications that we take, research has shown that there can be effects on aquatic organisms like fish and frogs.”

Here is some advice. If your starting a new medication gets a weeks worth and a prescription. Many people get large quantities of medication and they do not really know if they can tolerate it.

Transfer unused medicines to collectors registered with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Authorized sites may be retail, hospital or clinic pharmacies, and law enforcement locations. Some offer mail-back programs or collection receptacles (“drop-boxes”). Visit the DEA’s website or call 1-800-882-9539 for more information and to find an authorized collector in your community.

If no disposal instructions are given on the prescription drug labeling and no take-back program is available in your area, throw the drugs in the household trash following these steps:

  1. Remove them from their original containers and mix them with an undesirable substance, such as used coffee grounds, dirt or kitty litter (this makes the drug less appealing to children and pets, and unrecognizable to people who may intentionally go through the trash seeking drugs).
  2. Place the mixture in a sealable bag, empty can or other container to prevent the drug from leaking or breaking out of a garbage bag.
  3. Make sure you scratch out or remove the prescription label. (Do this with empty prescription bottles that you throw in the recycling bin.)

I really do not like the idea of throwing your medications in the garbage. What if someone’s dog got loose and ate it and got sick and died. Or some wild animal got a hold of it. This is last ditch effort. Better than flushing but not better than dropping off.

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I really like the idea of bringing it somewhere and having it disposed of correctly.

Click here for a drop off places in Florida.

Here is a list of our local places.

Brevard County
The Prescription Drug Take-Back Initiative
Citizens of Brevard County can drop off medications at any of the BCSO precincts.
Find addresses here:
http://www.brevardsheriff.com/precincts.php

Indian River County
The Sheriff’s Office provides this service at 4055 41st Avenue, Vero Beach. See this website for more information: http://www.myirchd.org/ClinicsandServices/Medication_Disposal.html

Palm Beach County
“Operation Pill Drop” has several drop-off sites listed here:
http://www.swa.org/site/hhw/haz_waste_home/hhw_home_rev1.htm

Martin County
Permanent Drop Box Location:

Martin County Sheriff’s Office
800 Southeast Monterey Road
Stuart, FL

There is also one at the substation in Indian Town

16550 SW Warfield Blvd, Indiantown, FL 34956
(772) 597-2101

 

St. Lucie County
Permanent Drop Box Location:

Port St. Lucie Sheriff’s Office.
Prescription Medication Disposal Box

Check out this great program by Lake County. I think all of us that live near the Indian River Lagoon can do this very easily.

Lake County
www.Tavares.org
Tavares, Florida has established a “Don’t Flush” campaign that resulted in an overflow of unused medications being turned into the Tavares Police. It’s not unusual for the collection box to be filled to capacity several times a day. The low cost campaign consisted of 50 posters and 2,000 bookmarks. The posters were supplied to local doctors and other medical providers. Bookmarks are distributed to our local library and to doctor’s offices. A City staff member, when available, will stop by nursing homes and assisted living facilities to drop off a supply of bookmarks or to informally speak to staff members about the program. The campaign was initiated by our Water Department and our message emphasizes the harm these pills can do to our water supply and our local wildlife if disposed of by flushing or pouring them down the drain.

References

How to Dispose of Unused Medications.

Florida Department of Environmental Protection