Who is Alico?

Last year when we were trying to get our reservoir to send clean water south to stop salt water intrusion, stop the toxic discharges, save the Everglades, and save the water of South Florida the Everglades Coalition after the yearly meeting hired a PR firm to sell the reservoir.

They hired a woman named Sarah Bascom to this. Sarah also worked as the PR spokesman for Alico. Good gig Sarah if you can get. Working for both’s sides.

I wrote this

PR Firm plays both sides of the road. Makes stupid remarks.

In a few weeks it will the beginning of a new legislative session. Already there are some bad bills being filed. Fracking. Bills to take the sunshine away.
It makes me think what kind of people are these that have so little regard for us the people who elected them.
Even if your complicit and go with leadership because your afraid of the punishment you still complicit.
Last week when I drove to Sarasota there was an office on route 70 just west of 27.  This place was called Alico Chemical. I would have gotten a photo on the way home but I was in dire need of a ladies room.

“Alico believes that its new membership in CNI will allow it to fulfill its chemical requirements on a more independent, sustainable and efficient basis as the company grows.

CNI is a stock held marketing and sales corporation that has been doing business for over 40 years, supplying independently owned agricultural retailers in 21 states. The focus is to be the preferred supplier of agricultural inputs (crop protection products, seed and       , to our dealers/owners which represent over 335 retail locations. Our operations stretch from the East Coast of the US to the West Coast, linking many of these agricultural markets. CNI offers great value to our customers with a consistent, reliable, and strong business model and to suppliers with influence, direction, molecule management, and access to the major US agricultural markets.

alico

Chem Nut, Inc. markets and sells agricultural inputs, such as agrichemicals (agrichemical refers to the broad range of pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides, fungicides and nematicides. It may also include synthetic fertilizers, hormones and other chemical growth agents, and concentrated stores of raw animal manure.), micronutrients, seeds, and adjuvants (A pharmacological agent added to a drug, predictably affecting the action of the drug’s active ingredient. ) to farm retail businesses and dealers in the United States. The company was founded in 1974 and is based in Leesburg, Georgia. It has locations in Sebring, Florida; Tarboro, North Carolina; Weyers Cave, Virginia; and Lubbock and Dumas, Texas.

Formerly called Chem Nut.”

According it’s own website Alico incorporated is
the Largest Citrus Producer

From the website

“Recently announced acquisitions of three Florida citrus producers will make Alico’s citrus division the largest citrus producer in the United States, with total pro forma 2014 production of 10 million boxes annually.
Alico owns and manages approximately 114,000 acres devoted to citrus, cattle, farming, conservation and natural resources.
We own and manage Ranch and Conservation land in Collier, Hendry and Polk Counties and engage in Cattle Production, Sod and Native Plant Sales, Land Leasing for recreational and grazing purposes and conservation activities. Ranch and Conservation totals approximately 64,500 gross acres. We occasionally lease the same acreage for more than one purpose.
Our Cattle operation is engaged in the production of beef cattle and is located in Hendry and Collier Counties. The breeding herd consisted of approximately 8,600 cows and bulls and we plan to increase the size of our herd in the near future to the extent practicable. We primarily sell our calves to feed yards and yearling grazing operations in the United States. We also sell cattle through local livestock auction markets and to contract cattle buyers in the United States. These buyers provide ready markets for our cattle. We believe that the loss of any one or a few of these buyers would not have a material effect on our Cattle operations. Revenue from ranch and conservation operations was approximately 9.2%, 6.6%, and 5.8% of total operating revenue for each of the years ended September 30, 2014, 2013, and 2012, respectively.

Water Storage Contract Approval
In December 2012, the South Florida Water Management District (“SFWMD”) issued a solicitation request for projects to be considered for the Northern Everglades Payment for Environmental Services Program.  In March 2013, the Company submitted its response proposing a dispersed water management project on its ranch land.

On December 11, 2014, the SFWMD approved a contract, based on the submitted response, with the Company.  The contract term is eleven years and allows up to one year for implementation (design, permitting, construction and construction completion certification) and ten years of operation whereby the Company will provide water retention services. Payment for these services includes an amount not to exceed $4,000,000 of reimbursement for implementation. In addition it provides for an annual fixed payment of $12,000,000 for operations and maintenance costs as long as the project is in compliance with the contract and subject to annual SFWMD Governing Board (“Board”) approval of funding.  The contract specifies that the Board has to approve the payments annually and there can be no assurance that it will approve the annual fixed payments.

Conservation Easement
In the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2013 we were granted an easement to the United States Department of Agriculture (“USDA”), through its administering agency, The Natural Resources Conservation Service, on approximately 11,600 acres of our Ranch and Conservation land located in Hendry County, Florida.

interactive map
http://www.alicoinc.com/interactive-map#all=1

Alico was founded by the Alexander Family which included Former Florida Senator JD Alexander.

He supposedly resigned as CEO.

November 22, 2013

The resignation of Alico CEO JD Alexander on Nov. 6 ends the storied ownership of one of the biggest agribusiness companies in the state.

In October, New York-based Arlon Group and private investors Remy Trafelet and George Brokaw, operating as 734 Agriculture LLC, agreed to pay $37 per share in cash for 50.5% of Alico controlled by Atlantic Blue Group, the heirs to the fortune of the Ben Hill Griffin citrus family.

The deal, worth $137.8 million, closed Nov. 19.

But while Alexander will no longer be the Fort Myers-based company’s chief executive, he won’t be straying too far. In a Nov. 12 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Alico says the company will pay Alexander $2 million annually for the next two years as part of a consulting and non-compete agreement.

In an article in the Ledger he said he was forced to resign all due to issues within Alico and Atlantic Blue which seem to be family driven. The sources in the Ledger article did not want to be identified because they were afraid of retribution.

wow.

Clayton Wilson is now the CEO of ALICO

Here is his bio

Mr. Wilson has served as Alico’s President, Chief Executive Officer and Director since November, 2013 and brings to the Board extensive knowledge and experience in the citrus industry. Mr. Wilson is a third generation citrus grower and has been actively involved in the citrus industry for over 28 years. He is the Chief Executive Officer of 734 Citrus Holdings, LLC, d/b/a Silver Nip Citrus. His responsibilities include the oversight of all aspects of the company’s citrus operations. Mr. Wilson is Vice President and Chairman of the Board for Latt Maxcy Corporation and also serves on the board of Citizens Bank and Trust. Mr. Wilson is also a board member of many industry associations, including Ranch One Cooperative, Cooperative Producers, Inc. and Gulf Harvesting, Inc. and is past President of Highlands County Citrus Growers Association. He currently serves as a board member and Vice President of Citrus Marketing Services and is a past board member of the Harvesting Advisory Council for the Florida Department of Citrus. He holds a degree in Commerce and Business Administration from the University of Alabama.

Source: Alico Inc. on 01/28/2015

SO this ALICO. They like water farming. They like chemicals. They can make a lot of money as our Everglades dies, our aquifers fill up with salt water, the discharges continue and the Florida Bay continues to implode.
For us it’s our Florida. For them it’s just cold hard cash.

Water Farming, Alico, Martin County

on the snout

Legislative money could flow into Treasure Coast water farms

“The Caulkins Citrus Co. water farm, a 413-acre reservoir between Palm City and Indiantown, stores excess water from the C-44 Canal, where it evaporates and percolates into the ground instead of reaching the St. Lucie River. The former citrus grove has kept nearly 6 billion gallons of water out of the C-44 Canal.

he 2015 Legislature approved $30 million for dispersed water management projects, which included the water farm projects; but Scott took the money out of the state budget.

Scott said he thought the money should come from the South Florida Water Management District. But Draper said it didn’t help that money for the proposed 35,000-acre Alico Inc. water farm in Hendry County “was rolled in” with the Caulkins and Evans projects.

As approved by the water district board in December 2014, the Alico project was designed to keep 30 billion gallons of water out of the Caloosahatchee River estuary on Florida’s west coast at a cost of $12 million a year for 10 years.

Since starting operations in May, the Evans water farm on the C-24 Canal has met its contract goal of keeping nearly 1.2 billion gallons of water from entering the St. Lucie River. Its contract runs until May 2017; so Evans doesn’t have to get money from the upcoming legislative session.

Instead, Ronald “Ron” L. Edwards, president and CEO of Evans Properties, wants money for two water farms it has proposed: on the C-23 Canal just east of St. Lucie County’s Bluefield Preserve park and on the C-25 Canal straddling the Indian River-Okeechobee county line, where the company’s long-term goal is to build a 3,000-acre reservoir and a stormwater treatment area that would sell water to send north to the St. Johns River.”

ohhhhhh

I see now. We didn’t get our reservoir because someone is planning on building their own and then selling water.

How stupid of me.

and doesn’t this water eventually end up back in the lagoon as it percolates down now with all the  chemicals that are in the soil making the situation worse?

Just sayin.

 

How to create a certified wildlife habitat

So I was in Sarasota over Christmas and I took Barney for walk. It wasn’t really a walk it was more like a stop, sniff, urinate, pull sort of exercise.  It’s a good thing it was a short walk to the Bay or I may have never returned.
It was a cool area. It’s called Indian Beach/Sapphire Shores.

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I saw this sign and I knew that my friends back in Jensen and many of my blogger friends would love this so I took a photo of it.
Maybe we can all do this together as a project and get a sign for our yards.

There’s been a lot building and destruction around us. Let’s make our yards a place where wild life can thrive.

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Whether you have an apartment balcony or a 20-acre farm, you can create a garden that attracts beautiful wildlife and helps restore habitat in commercial and residential areas. By providing food, water, cover and a place for wildlife to raise their young you not only help wildlife, but you also qualify to become an official Certified Wildlife Habitat®.

How to Create a Wildlife-Friendly Garden

 

Provide Food for Wildlife

Everyone needs to eat! Planting native forbs, shrubs and trees is the easiest way to provide the foliage, nectar, pollen, berries, seeds and nuts that many species of wildlife require to survive and thrive. You can also incorporate supplemental feeders and food sources.

 

Supply Water for Wildlife

Wildlife need clean water sources for many purposes, including drinking, bathing and reproduction. Water sources may include natural features such as ponds, lakes, rivers, springs, oceans and wetlands; or human-made features such as bird baths, puddling areas for butterflies, installed ponds or rain gardens.

 

Create Cover for Wildlife

Wildlife require places to hide in order to feel safe from people, predators and inclement weather. Use things like native vegetation, shrubs, thickets and brush piles or even dead trees.

 

Give Wildlife a Place to Raise Their Young

Wildlife need a sheltered place to raise their offspring. Many places for cover can double as locations where wildlife can raise young, from wildflower meadows and bushes where many butterflies and moths lay their eggs, or caves where bats roost and form colonies.

 

Help Wildlife Thrive with Healthy Habitat

Wildlife thrives in a healthy habitat with the food sources appropriate to their ecosystem, clean water, and plants free from harmful chemicals. Practicing sustainable gardening with the use of native plants, water conservation, and not using pesticides or herbicides ensures wildlife abundance.

 

Ready…Set…Certify!

Once you have provided these essential elements to make a healthy and sustainable wildlife habitat, join the thousands of wildlife enthusiasts across the country who have earned the distinction of being part of NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitat® program.

 

 

What will Martin County Become?

I moved here to Martin County six years ago. I literally was running away from Palm Beach County. The whole place was closing in on me. The people, the traffic, the constant building way, way out to the Everglades, the traffic.

I had driven up here for years for work. I even came up after one of the Hurricanes. I think it was Jeanne. I needed air conditioning. Everyone was so nice.

I drove up Dixie in Rio and always stopped to take a photo of Mrs Peters sign. I took video of the river and the sailboats.

I always felt special driving under the Jensen Arch.

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I loved it because it never changed. It always felt like old Florida to me. A  place where the people who lived here knew how to keep it special.

It must be filled with special people and I was right about that!

Then I moved here. People had kayaks and paddle boards and it reminded me of Boulder, Colorado where people drive around with Kayaks on the roof of their cars. A funky downtown with so much potential. An entire area with so much potential to be funky and fun.

Downtown Stuart with all it fun shops was a great place to tell people to meet me for lunch.

It never changed.

I could live here. I can breath here. People smile here. They are polite. They care about where they live. No one was driving up your rear end and yelling and giving you the finger.

In the last few years we have been polluted, multiple trains are coming and we have 200 sober homes here. People are being court ordered here for treatment. People that can be kicked out any time of their sober home to the streets. People are driving up my rear end and giving the finger when I pull over to let them go.

And don’t even start with the NIMBY stuff. I’ll save that for another day. There is a big difference between being a NIMBY and not wanted polluted gross water and junkies. I think that both go together.

A month ago there was someone shooting up heroin at the corner store. Some guy was upset because he had to pay for his gas with his weed money.

Many motels have been sold and now they are treatment centers. Let’s not talk about this or deal with it. Let’s wait until it’s really bad.

These treatment center are not for our neighbors but for people up north. Come to Florida. You can be a junkie here. Live in Florida. You get nothing. If you are over 65 and need alcohol or drug treatment through Medicare there is one choice and that choice will probably put you on a psychiatric unit with  a general population and not with the program you need.

The people in charge say there is nothing that can be done. That these homes ( and let me remind you that all a sober home is is a place where people live sober. Anything else is a treatment center and must be governed under Florida Law.) We are learning now that many of these places are just scams run by drug addicts or other scam artists to make money.

A scam in Florida can you believe it?

These places are not Switzerland. If there is something illegal going on there has to be a way to investigate. I think people are not thinking hard enough and they are being snowed.

The water I moved here for is unswimable. So many people I know have gotten sick. I cannot take my grandson or my dog there.

There seems to be no answer or any one taking responsibility for what Martin County is becoming. No one.

The junkies keep coming , the dirty water keeps coming and the trains are on the way.

Last year both our Representatives Gayle Harrell and Mary Lynn Magar refused to lift a finger to do the one thing that would have helped us. Millions of dollars are spent that will never make a difference. Someone is getting rich while we are still getting polluted. US.

We have been taxed in Martin County 75 million dollars to water storage so we don’t have to have discharges. Well that didn’t work. We begged for a reservoir with the water going south as mother nature put it in the first place. That didn’t happen.

In the election in 2006 ” The Palm Beach Post, which criticized Harrell for “too obediently” voting the party line and for having “so little clout in Tallahassee that she can’t protect her well-intentioned legislation from harmful amendments.”Ultimately, however, the conservative nature of the district proved too much for Ramos to overcome, and Harrell won re-election over him, scoring 54% of the vote to her opponent’s 46%

In 2008, The Palm Beach Post endorsed Fetterman over Harrell, praising the incumbent for closing a loophole that allowed sexual predators to avoid prosecution, and once again criticizing Harrell for her record in the legislature, where “she wasn’t known for bucking the GOP leadership.”However, Harrell was able to dispatch Fetterman with relative ease, regaining her seat and earning 56% of the vote to Fetterman’s 44%.”

We know she doesn’t buck the leadership. That’s why she refused to help her own constituents. She is also been conferring with people up north about the voluntary legislation regarding sober homes encouraging people to open them up down here as long as they do a voluntary sign up.

She should be asking herself: Why is everyone sending their junkies to Martin County?

She is no friend of ours and certainly not a friend of the water. She just had some kind of event. Invited all the Republicans , left everyone else out so she has no interest in being inclusive and getting anything done. It’s like  all the people that have worked so hard for the water don’t exist.

She should be fighting for us instead of cow-towing to the leadership in Tallahassee.

On Mary Lynn Magars Wikapedia page there is nothing. She said the same thing last year. She couldn’t so anything. I can’t find anything she has actually done. I must be wrong. How can this be true? Someone please tell me she has done something.

I say this because of our ( The train is the train and we have to wait for that one) pollution we are loosing our tourist base. We certainly have more people but those people are going to requires services we just don’t have for our people that live here.

In the last election we picked our clean water candidates. They were bipartisan and they reflected the people who understand the water and have the smarts and the know all to get this stuff done. They certainly would not have destroyed the water of South Florida, continued to allow Salt Water Intrusion, discharges and everything else because of their party and because of their ego.

Last year we painted and sent solidarity fish to multiple representatives and senators. The only one that answered was Thad Altman. Not Gayle, or MaryLynn Magar or even the Democrats answered us.

altman

 

Yesterday, I read an article about eviscerating our ability to get Florida Government Records.  No sunshine. Another bill was filed to override us saying we don’t want fracking. Who’s for  fracking raise your hands! Come on higher!

In the coming year we have some big decisions to make. I hope that one of them is not voting party lines but voting for keeping our Martin County a great place to live.

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We don’t need vindictiveness, stupid games, egos, grandstanding, and more of the same BS. We need to work together or else we’re gonna have a dead river and people shooting up heroin in all our corner stores. We need people that not only understand the issues but understand how to work together with people and are willing to to stand up to get things done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekly Photo: NOW

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Right NOW I’m sitting and looking at my pretty tree. When I first moved here I didn’t even bother.  Too much drama of the past.

I have worked Christmas for the past 6 years. It gave other nurses a chance to enjoy their holidays. I’d like to say it was meaningless. It wasn’t. It was horrifying. I had Christmas PTSD. This year Christmas had wonderful meaning by spending it with family.

So what happens with time and working on letting go is of course things change. The pain is long gone and a feeling of contentment arrives.

I found these little trees at the Fresh Market and they were perfect. Big enough for my needs. Being a table top also was great since my dog didn’t feel the need to urinate on it.

When I first brought it home he got very excited until he saw it go on the table.

The ornaments I took when I was divorced were the one that were meaningful to me.  Gifts from friends and hand made golden retriever ornaments. Ornaments with my old guys names Machi and Casey.  I loved the twinkly white lights.  This year I added a string of color and it changed everything. And of course a string of shells.

It’s almost like this little tree is an indication of my mental health filled with an understanding of the past , anticipation  of the future but the ability to just sit and be,  enjoy the tree, the lights and the now.