Fare Thee Well WordPress Writing 101

This is my last blogpost for Writing 101.

What did I get out of it?

I think the best part was meeting other bloggers and reading their wonderful blogs. So to our instructors and all the bloggers I say.

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For myself it gave me other ways to present the information that I had in  a bit more of an organized way and not so epic. I could literally spend an entire day not doing anything else but looking things up and following trails. This is what I love to do. Research. Weaving things together.

But what about the future?

I’m  going to do Blogging 101 again because there were some things I missed. Also Photo 101 when it comes around again and I hope to see you guys there.

I’m putting all my good ideas here. That way I’m putting it out to the universe.

The main reason is so I won’t loose it.

I had a running list of ideas for my blog and it’s lost on my computer because I can’t remember what I named it and it wasn’t something that made sense like “Blog Post Ideas.”

Here are some of things I’m to continue to do:

Florida Back Roads

Sugar U

Weekly roundup

Thing you don’t see on the tv

Documentary Reviews

Bear Updates

Water Updates

Fun Polls

More blogs about Meditation

A blogpost about Pain Management

More letters to our legislators

blogs with action alerts

blogs about rescue

more about mental illness

and more about how we can all come together in some kind common goodness and do great things.

We can do great things.

We are bloggers.

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Day 11: Writing and not writing: When I’m not writing I’m still writing.

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Day 11: Writing and not writing: When I’m not writing I’m still writing.

If I told you I would have to kill you.

Dr No

Writing my blog is the therapy that helps me to unremember the day that I really can’t talk about. It’s puts a period at the end of the work day and moves my intention, my attention to focus on something else besides work. It helps me keep the HIPPA promise.

What goes on in Vegas stays in Vegas.

Mark E. Brown

I spend my work days driving around to people’s houses. I have great thinking time in the car. I have a computer. I have two computers. I have two computers and an iphone. I try to chart in real time. It never happens. My hot spot doesn’t work most of the time.  I still have a hard time computing at the job because I like to look at the people I’m talking to but I have grown to accept this.

It is what it is.

Right now when I’m not working, charting or writing I’m working on a video project that I love.

If I told you I would have to kill you

Dr No

The rest of my time is spent being the concierge to these two lovely creatures.

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In. out. in. out.

Soon the weather will be cool and for MeMe I’ll only have to do the outs.

Barney will be 18 on October 23 so I look at every in and out as potentially the last one.

Today is Yom Kippur. I took the day off. I told everyone to leave me alone so I could work on my meditation, rejuvenate my soul and find some peace.

My brain is aching.

My soul screaming for relief.

But if meditation is the intention for attention to bring you to this very  moment in the present.  Writing is meditation.

Then I’m meditating.

Writing 101: Indian RIver Lagoon Birds

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#wordpress

#indianriverlagoon

Indian RIver Lagoon Birds

The assignment was to write something based on an image.  We were given a place to get images. I went there and I donated 8 images and then decided to use my own.

lagoon birds

Lagoon Birds

When we had the toxic discharges from Lake Okeechobee in 2013 all the birds went away. There were no birds.

Gone.

I used to wake up to 100’s of birds tweeting in my back yard.

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I have seen a few interesting red birds and of course mourning doves and I did see the wood stork last week. It’s fall so hopefully they will be back soon. There are some birds but not in the great amounts there were when I moved here.

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Here is an interesting article by the Audubon Society.

“A new analysis by the National Audubon Society reveals that populations of some of America’s most familiar and beloved birds have taken a nosedive over the past forty years, with some down as much as 80 percent. The dramatic declines are attributed to the loss of grasslands, healthy forests and wetlands, and other critical habitats from multiple environmental threats such as sprawl, energy development, and the spread of industrialized agriculture. The study notes that these threats are now compounded by new and broader problems including the escalating effects of global warming. In concert, they paint a challenging picture for the future of many common species and send a serious warning about our increasing toll on local habitats and the environment itself.

Common Terns, which nest on islands and forage for fish near ocean coasts, lakes and rivers, are vulnerable to development, pollution and sea level rise from global warming. Populations in unmanaged colonies have dropped as much as 70 percent, making the species’ outlook increasingly dependent on targeted conservation efforts.

Little Blue Herons now number 150,000 in the U.S. and 110,000 in Mexico, down 54 percent in the U.S. Their decline is driven by wetland loss from development and degradation of water quality, which limits their food supply.”

Here is an excellent article I found in BioScience starring out friend Dr Edie Widder.

“Just as fishes in the IRL depend on mangroves and seagrasses, wading birds depend on fishes as prey. Herons, egrets, and their relatives are a barometer of how the lagoon’s mosaic of life is faring, according to ornithologist Hilary Swain, executive director of the Archbold Biological Station in Lake Placid. In her research, Swain found that wading birds are one of the most widely recognized elements of biodiversity in the IRL, with 16 species recorded. Among them are the great egret, reddish egret, little blue heron, tricolored heron, wood stork, white ibis, and roseate spoonbill.

birds at bird island Jan 2011

birds at bird island Jan 2011

Swain discovered that drawdowns—the periodic lowering of water levels in mosquito control impoundments—result in higher numbers of wading birds in those areas, and that many of the lagoon’s wading birds frequent such impoundments, especially when water levels there are shallow (the easier for the birds to catch fish). Wading birds in the IRL are also found only in locations where, in fact, the fishing is good, making information on herons and their kin useful in determining the overall health of the lagoon.

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Birds on bird island Jan 2011

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Birds on Bird Island Jan 2011

Mangroves, seagrasses, fishes, birds: How do scientists know how many species there are in the Indian River Lagoon? “We don’t know the exact number,” Tuck Hines says, “but we have a pretty good idea of the IRL’s flora and fauna, thanks to years of research that led to a project called the Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory.”

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Birds on Bird Island Jan 2011

Developed by the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, the species inventory is an ever-expanding listing of the species of animals and plants that make their home in the lagoon. Users can access photographic images and taxonomic information via a Web site (www.sms.si.edu/irlspec/index.htm). “The IRL Species Inventory has become the place to go to get information on the lagoon’s biodiversity, whether you’re a scientist, student, government official, or citizen,” Hines says. With some 68 federal, state, local, and other government agencies involved in managing the IRL, Hines adds, “it’s imperative that there be one central place in which this information can be found.”

I think we all need to help inventory the Indian River Lagoon and be on the lookout for all the wonderful birds we use to have to see if they come back.

You all come back now you hear?

Writing 101: Funny

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In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Retrospectively Funny.”

I had a hard time picking a word.

The first word I thought I’d write about was synchronicity.

“the simultaneous occurrence of events that appear significantly related but have no discernible causal connection.” Like picking the word and seeing the prompt from yesterday was the same thing I picked. That’s amore!

Also, my assignment was to write a list and I had been meaning to write this reading list for our legislators.

Well that worked out great.

The second word that came to mind was the word “grounded.” Something I aspire to be every day and when I’m not you’ll find me out there seeking assistance. Boring.

Funny.

I like.

So a funny thing happened this week.

Mostly everything I post on Facebook is important information about the environment. I do try to find funny memes. Funny memes and photos of my cat, dog and my grandson get the most likes. I could work on a piece for two days but everyone loves MeMe, Barney and Ethan.

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MeMe my cat

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Barney my almost 18 year old golden

So sometime over the weekend I posted this funny meme.

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Everyone could relate and I got some hysterical comments. If you know my circle of friends the conversation turned political and we were all cracking up.

Then later on I was watching “Flow: For the love of water” documentary and I went to google some about the fish in the Seine River changing sex.

I came across this article:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/testicleeating-fish-the-pacu-found-in-paris-with-fears-it-could-be-coming-to-the-uk-8798118.html

Go look at the photo. This fish with these freakish human teeth.

Testicle-eating fish, the Pacu, found in Paris with fears it could be coming to the UK

Pacu fish

So I tweet the article to my self. I also remember my fellow blogger and future Martin County Commissioner Jacqui wrote an article about these guys being in Lake Okeechobee!

http://jacquithurlowlippisch.com/tag/pacu/

Then this happened

There was some back and forth. It came at a very cranky moment because I felt like this person didn’t understand the context and I’m still having fantasies of inviting our legislators to Lake O for a swim.

Don’t take away my happy fantasy!

Out of my entire week of seriousness how can anyone take my laughter away.

not fair

Sadly it’s true. They are vegetarians. Which reminds me  of what my mother always said “Don’t judge a book by it’s cover.”

This poor guy has seen this post so many time and he is in the business of fish. Now I feel terrible.

Apparently you eat these little guys with the big teeth. ( why would mother nature give them such big teeth. What vegetation grows that they need choppers like this to eat? Do I even want to know this.)

Apparently this guys sells them for food along with a bunch of other things that we all love like lobsta’s. Yes I know I spelled that wrong.

He did finally get the joke and I as usual learned something new.

and I  thought heard it all when I read about Dove AU Vin last week. But here’s how you cook the little guys.

So here is my gift to Squidbass-takes like chicken hahahahah

Here you go!

hahahha

Funny

Florida Legislators: Here’s your reading list!

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Florida Legislators: Here’s your reading list!

This past year has been very telling. Not only did these people ignore us but they ignored their job and couldn’t seem to get it done.

My assignment for writing 101 is to make a list. I’ve been wanting to make THIS list so its win-win.

We need to know our legislators actually understand the issues and problems with Florida. We cannot take for granted that they know anything.

I’d also like to hear from you guys about what you think and we can keep a running list.

I knew what books I wanted but decided to go to the wisest people I know. My circle of friends.

circle of friends

This was from my friend Marjorie.

Marjorie Shropshire : Oh, I have a whole long list LOL… But I think I’d start with Craig Pittman’s book on wetlands mitigation, and then move on to Ecosystems of Florida” so they could gain some kernel of understanding about how things in this state work; This Changes Everything, for some insight into what might be done about climate change; The Social Conquest of Earth, The Diversity of Life, and The Creation, all by E.O. Wilson for an overview of how humans fit into the world and can’t survive without natural systems; The Swamp, which we all know is the best explanation of the mess we’ve made of water management in Florida’s southern half; Priceless Florida, so they can see what we are losing; and finally, An Everglades Providence, a biography of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, to teach them what it means to do something bold, instead of sitting on their assess and eating out of the hands of their keepers.

I love Marjorie. She’s is very quiet. But when she speaks she is mighty!

I think we all agree on the Swamp and Craig and Matt’s book “Paving Paradise.”

So here I go

  1. Paving Paridise

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  1. The Swamp

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the end.

No only kidding.

I’m going to list them out by name because everyone had good choices.

3. Ecosystems of Florida

4. This Changes Everything

5. The Social Conquest of Earth E.O. Wilson

6. The Diversity of Life E.O. Wilson

7. The Creation E.O. Wilson

8. Priceless Florida

9. An Everglades Providence

My friend Richard suggested

10. “The value of life” by the 4 Americans left in Iran

Cris suggested

11.  The Lorax

Mike G suggested

12. Haricari 101 for dummies  (Which I don’t even think is a book but just a suggestion.)

Shelia suggested

13. Term Limits by Vince Flynn.

Lisa Suggested

14. My Florida” by Ernie Lyons

Rick suggested

15. Any book on civics

Linda suggested

16. Reading the constitution. Followed by a written test. (She also suggested The Swamp. )

Victoria suggested

17. The Everglades: River of Grass” Marjory Stoneman Douglas.

18. “Mother of Florida Forestry”

Robin suggested

19. Oranges and Inlets by Nathaniel Osborn. ( Will be out in book form soon)

Phyllis suggested

20. The Shack. By Robert Young

21. Golfing with God

So here’s my list.

Any other suggestions leave below!